I quite like the strong asymmetrical farm on the open end of the house. I actually think it could be stronger, the other elements inside it simplified. It’s visually intriguing and I think it gets a little lost at the peak. I quite like the strong asymmetrical farm on the open end of the house. I actually think it could be stronger, the other elements inside it simplified. It’s visually intriguing and I think it gets a little lost at the peak.

I quite like the strong asymmetrical farm on the open end of the house. I actually think it could be stronger, the other elements inside it simplified. It’s visually intriguing and I think it gets a little lost at the peak.

I do tend to prefer timbers that have a red tone to them, but I’m increasingly enjoying these warm honey tones. Dark warm yellows, not pale, but the red is less important. 

I love the use of very blue-green glass here. Not sure what it would look like looking through it, but it’s gorgeous from the outside! This whole building is beautifully simple in pattern and materials, using the outburst irregular balconies to create interest.

Mmm, totally feel. Warmth and simplicity, lots of tall lines. I also definitely like different levels in the garden outside. It’s small, but it’s enough of a raised garden bed that it gives definition that counters the riot of growth in the bed.

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I’ve decided I really like these semi-courtyards, where the wings of the house partially surround a small area. Its cosy without being too enclosed.
I do have to say that while I like timber, it can be overused and I feel like in this case it’s a bit much. I do like the black beams contrasting the honey cladding, so maybe some other ground surface.

I’ve decided I really like these semi-courtyards, where the wings of the house partially surround a small area. Its cosy without being too enclosed.

I do have to say that while I like timber, it can be overused and I feel like in this case it’s a bit much. I do like the black beams contrasting the honey cladding, so maybe some other ground surface.

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The more I look at this one the more I’m sure I’ve reblogged it before. It’s still good though, so what the hell! Nicely delineated spaces that flow into each other well, beautiful use of greenery in a very tight space. They’ve managed two quite private spaces without making a small space look cramped.

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Mmmmm puddle staircases. I love when stairs do this kind of spread at the bottom. I’d probably try and continue the curve up the length of the staircase, in and then back out toward the top, in some kind of warm golden red wood to look like a spill of honey.

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I quite like this kind of big atrium space. I’ve been struggling with designing a house with an interior courtyard that doesn’t end up being enormous. Having an internal room with a glass ceiling (possibly openable) could solve that issue. I also like the irregular stone walls. Nicely cut stone is good too, but there’s a colour and texture here you can’t get from that.

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I love big doors that open out onto gardens. In some ways I actually prefer ones like this example- double doors rather than bifolds. It’s big enough to feel open, but has more structure to it, and there’s a clearer definition of inside/outside transitions.

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I really like the way they’ve chosen to place the walls in this to break up the traditional attic room triangle. It’s made for a really interesting space. I also love that bed nook, and the way they’ve changed surface materials between the nook and the rest of the room. The white keeps it bright, the timber keeps it warm in colour, and the change emphasises the striking geometry of the room against the square window.